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Who Died In The Battle Of Agincourt Essay

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Lead Story

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Literary

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Henry Fielding becomes justice of the peace

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Battle of Agincourt, (October 25, 1415), decisive victory of the English over the French in the Hundred Years’ War. In 1413 the new king of England, Henry V, took the opportunity of a power struggle inside France to renew English claims to the French throne and invade. His victory against a much larger French army repeated the successes at the battles of Crécy and Poitiers, enabling him to dominate northern France.

In 1396 England and France signed the thirty-year Truce of Paris to end the long-running Hundred Years’ War. However, the French continued to support England’s enemies in Scotland and Wales and in 1403 raided several Channel ports. Inside France, the intermittent insanity of King Charles VI prompted a power struggle between the rival dukes of Orléans and Burgundy, with both sides appealing for English help. In 1413 Henry V came to the English throne. He formed an alliance with Jean, Duke of Burgundy: the duke promised to remain neutral in return for gaining land as Henry’s vassal.

With one side of the French conflict neutralized, Henry prepared for war. In August 1415 he sailed for Normandy with an army of 12,000 men. After a six-week siege he captured Harfleur, with the loss of half his army from casualties and disease. Henry then marched overland toward English-held Calais but found his way blocked by a far larger French army led by Charles d’Albret, Constable of France. Henry drew up his army where the road to Calais passed through thick woods. It had been raining hard for several days and the fields on either side were newly plowed. Placing his archers on either flank, with more archers and dismounted knights in the center, he hammered rows of pointed stakes into the road. Confronted by this narrow battlefield, the French formed up into three battles or divisions, one behind the other, the first two consisting of dismounted men with some crossbowmen, the third mostly mounted men.

At first the two armies faced each other down the road, probably about 1 mile (1.6 km) apart. The French knew of Henry’s youthful enthusiasm and hoped he might attack them first. Henry, however, decided to force a French attack and moved his army forward a short distance. The trick worked, for, unable to control his eager men, the French Constable ordered an attack. As the first French battle advanced, mounted knights from either flank galloped past them toward the English lines. Under intense fire from the English archers and hampered by the weight of their armor, the muddy ground, and the rows of stakes, they were soon in trouble. This initial cavalry attack had been completely repulsed before the first battle arrived on foot. Fighting their way through to the English line, they were then attacked by the English archers wielding axes, swords, and daggers in close combat. Within minutes, the entire first battle had been killed or captured. The second French battle then surged forward but fell back with heavy losses.

At this point Henry received reports that his camp a mile to the rear was under attack. In reality, this was just a group of peasants out for plunder but, knowing that his small army could not fight on two fronts and guard the many prisoners, Henry ordered all French prisoners to be killed. When the third and final French battle assault was thrown back, Henry ordered his few mounted men to charge the French lines. The result was a rout, with more than a hundred French noblemen, all supporters of the Orléans faction, dead and many more captured. The English had been led brilliantly by Henry, but the incoherent tactics of the French had also contributed greatly to their defeat. Henry had won against overwhelming odds.

Losses: English, 400 of 6,000; French, 5,000 of 30,000.

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