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College Admission Video Essay Slashfilm

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch the opening monologue from John Mulaney and Nick Kroll at the Independent Spirit Awards. Plus, see how I, Tonya and Battle of the Sexes depicted their respective sports in such a realistic way, and learn about how Paul Thomas Anderson uses hot dog shapes in all of his films. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, see how the visual effects artists from I, Tonya made it look like Margot Robbie was a professional figure skate. Plus, watch a video essay breaking down how director Denis Villeneuve uses color on film, and see how the opening crawl for Star Wars: Episode 9 can fix the supposed missteps of Star Wars: The Last Jedi for dissatisfied fans. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, see how some of cinema’s most famous monsters compare to each other in size. Plus, a closer look at how acts are structured in Marvel movies by taking an in-depth look at the script for The Avengers and also take a 360-degree tour of the Saturday Night Live studio from the main stage. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch Will Ferrell‘s auditioning tape when he was just a comedian trying out for a spot on the cast of Saturday Night Live. Plus, learn about the art of production design from The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and see how visual effects were employed to make multiple versions of Noomi Rapace in the sci-fi film What Happened to Monday?.Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, listen to a convincing defense of Ridley Scott‘s most recent sci-fi sequel, Alien: Covenant. Plus, go behind the scenes of Chris Hemsworth‘s new war drama 12 Strong, and see how Saturday Night Livecreated the vibrant music video for their music video sketch all about Stanley Tucci. Read More »

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The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, a video essay illustrates how Steven Spielberg expertly uses sound design to immerse you in the world of his movies. Plus, find out how Gremlins changed the world in more ways than one, and watch a trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi edited in the style of the Avengers: Infinity War trailer. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, find out which of the many different cuts of the original Blade Runner you should watch. Plus, see an incredible shot-for-shot breakdown of one of the most exciting sequences in Raiders of the Lost Ark, and watch as Jimmy Kimmel goes undercover on Reddit, Wikipedia, IMDb and more. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, find out how HBO is keeping you from seeing movies the way they’re supposed to be seen. Plus, learn about an interesting theory about the glowing briefcase in Pulp Fiction, and watch as an aspiring talk show host with autism takes over The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Read More »

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch the TARDIS console from Peter Capaldi’s tenure as Doctor Who torn down one last time. Plus, watch a video essay deconstructing the train scene from Sam Raimi‘s Spider-Man 2, and see one climactic battle from Star Wars: The Last Jedi recreated like an 16-bit video game (but beware of spoilers). Read More »

Dunkirk is a feat of cinematic splendor, a visual and auditory assault that is less a standard film than it is a visceral experience.

There is barely a plot to Dunkirk — you could probably summarize the entire thing within five minutes — but it makes the film all the more affecting. There’s no need for dialogue telling you who, what, when, where, why when you can read the fear in the battle-worn soldiers’ eyes and the apprehension in every British citizen’s face. But is that enough to create a substantial silent film? A YouTube video essay channel decided to find out.

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For most people, going to the movies is meant to be an escape from the real world. Therefore, it’s somewhat surprising that there are viewers who have a hard time connecting to movies simply because they’re not realistic. Whether it’s because the science of a movie isn’t accurate, or stylized visuals make it hard to relate to the narrative, some people just can’t suspend their disbelief enough to get lost in a movie like Guardians of the Galaxy, The Lord of the Rings or La La Land.

A new video essay attempts to explain the importance of realism in movies, why people seem to look for even the most fantastical of movies to have some semblance of realism, and why realism isn’t really what those viewers should be looking for. Watch the movie realism video essay after the jump.

The video above illustrates the difference between formalism and realism, and explains how pretty much all movies fall somewhere in between, but usually lean a little more towards one or the other. Some go for a more realistic style, presentation and narrative while others go for the more fantastical and unbelievable in those arenas. When a movie tries to strike a balance between those two, it doesn’t always work out, as in the case of Ang Lee’s Hulk, a movie that tries to be serious but doesn’t jibe well with the exaggerated comic book visual style.

Regardless of whether a film is realistic or not, the video essay explains that what’s really important is a movie’s verisimilitude. By that they mean a movie’s inner truth, or their own concept of reality. As long as a movie’s narrative doesn’t betray the reality of the universe in which the story takes place, then the audience will hopefully never be taken out of the experience to think that the film lacks realism, even if it’s a movie that’s basically a live-action cartoon like Speed Racer. That doesn’t make a movie critic proof though, since even scenarios that logically make sense within the reality of any given movie can still downright stupid, such as the Batman credit card in Batman & Robin.

What do you think about realism in film? Is it hard to swallow a film like Speed Racer even knowing that the verisimilitude of the movie is harmonious with the universe in which it exists? Is it easier to get lost in a movie that feels closer to the real world like The Dark Knight even if the concept of a superhero like Batman is still fairly unrealistic? Feel free to discuss in the comments below.

Thanks to The AV Club for bringing this to our attention.

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