Best Titles For Essays About Sisters

A Sister is a Forever Friend


A sister is a special kind of friend Forever Sisters My Friend, My Foe, My Sister Sisters are Sassy Sisters by Chance. Friends by Choice Sisters together forever


A sister is a special kind of friend.


Always My Sister, Always My Friend


Attached at the heart


Aye Aye Sisters!


Being sisters is something special


Big sister meets baby brother


Born Sisters, Forever Friends!


Forever Sisters


Girly Girlz


Growing Up Friends


I smile because you're my sister. I laugh because there's nothing you can do about it!


I've got all my sisters with me


Just Me & My Sis


Little Girls are Heaven's Flowers


My Friend, My Foe, My Sister.


My Lifetime Buddy


My Sister My Friend


My sister, my friend.


Sharing Sisters


Sister For Life


Sisters are Sassy


Sisters Are Soul Mates


Sisters by blood, friends by choice.


Sisters by chance,Friends by choice


Sisters by Chance. Friends by Choice.


Sisters by Chance. Friends by Choice.


Sisters for life Friends Forever


Sisters share that unique & special relationship that combines friends and family - a bond that is at the same time supportive and enduring. The woman who shares her life with a sister is blessed.


Sisters together forever


Sweet Sharing Sister


Tres Amigas~


Two of a Kind


We Have a Love Hate Relationship


Coming up with a killer book title is hard. There’s a lot at stake in a title: It’s your readers’ first impression of your work, and it’s got to be evocative, unique, and precise. The pressure can be overwhelming!

But we at Writer’s Relief have got some great tips to help you come up with the perfect title for your novel or your nonfiction book. And you can apply these concepts to your short stories and poetry as well. With a little preparation and brainstorming, you’ll land on the perfect title for your book!

Elements Of Great Book Titles

Poetic language. Some of the best titles—the ones we remember—use evocative language to make a statement. Sometimes, the language verges on poetic. Consider elusive and somewhat vague titles like: Gone with the Wind; Of Mice and Men; Grapes of Wrath; Snow Falling On Cedars; The Fault in Our Stars.

Action words. Titles that showcase strong verbs leap off the shelves. Things Fall Apart is clear and haunting. Gone Girl is energetic and in-your-face. A Game Of Thrones sets a precedent for tension.

Inherent mystery/conflict. Great titles hint at the story to come. They point to the main conflict: What’s at stake? When a title can concisely encapsulate action, you’ve got a great shot at getting a reader’s attention in just a few words.

Consider Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil: It’s a long title, but it’s so good. It suggests an epic battle between powerful archetypes, but it also offers the quiet, quaintly creepy image of a garden at night. The Light in Ruins does something similar.

Character’s names. Often (but not always) titles that make use of character names have an element of mystery attached to them as well. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; The Secret Life of Walter Mitty; The Picture of Dorian Gray; Harry Potter And The [Fill In The Blank Here]. Books with character names can also be whimsical, such as: Where’d You Go, Bernadette?; Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day; Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret.

Place names. If your book has a great setting (a setting that has strong branding), you might want to use that to your advantage. The Last Time I Saw Paris showcases the City of Lights with a touch of nostalgia (it also hints at conflict, at something lost and longed-for). Death Comes To Pemberley makes great use of the estate that’s familiar to all readers of Pride and Prejudice, but adds a modern layer of mystery and drama.

Quirky titles. Some titles embody contrasts that make readers say, huh? And, of course, that leads them to read the back cover to find out what’s going on: Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance; One of our Thursdays is Missing; Pineapple Grenade; Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

The one-word title. These titles tend to work best with really strong cover art. Here are a few one-word titles: Slammed; Affliction; Stranded, etc.

Titles And Book Genre

If you’re writing in a commercial book genre, be sure you have a good understanding of how titles within that particular genre work. And we wouldn’t recommend straying too far away from the conventions of genre book titles; fans of specific genres use titles as a kind of shorthand when they’re deciding what to buy and whether a book will live up to their expectations.

For example: Your thriller might be called Death At First Light. Your romance might be To Kiss A Lady. But you wouldn’t want to switch those titles around.

Just for fun: Check out this book title generator. And here are Goodreads users’ favorite book titles.

Title And Copyright Law

As of this writing, authors can’t copyright their titles in America (which is why if you plug certain titles into Amazon, you’ll come up not only with multiple movies but also multiple books of the same title).

That said, we don’t recommend using the same title that someone else has previously used. It makes it more difficult for your book to stand out.

When In Doubt, Get Help

If you’re coming up with a title, ask friends and family for help. Host a brainstorming session. Sometimes, a new perspective is the best way to hit on just the right title for your book.

But remember: If you’re hoping to publish with a traditional publisher, there’s some possibility that you might not be able to keep your title anyway. Publishers tend to change them (and, don’t worry, your publisher will fret about the perfect title right along with you).

Photo by Trevor Coultart.

QUESTION: What’s one of your favorite titles?

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